DCIT 2016 Abstracts


Short Papers
Paper Nr: 1
Title:

Surfing the Third Wave of Computing - Contracting with eObjects

Authors:

Kayleen Manwaring

Abstract: During the last two decades, a “third wave of computing” has emerged: a move from a model of accessing the Internet and other internetworks almost exclusively via a desktop computer to alternative forms of distributed information technologies, such as smartphones, wearable computers, and sensors and microprocessors embedded in everyday objects. Mobile commerce is now part of the mainstream of e-commerce technologies, with applications for mobile entertainment, retail shopping, banking, stock trading and gambling all well-established and on the rise. The widespread use of computing devices embedded into buildings and everyday objects has also moved from the vision of a few computer scientists to a (partial) reality, with current applications for home automation, energy management, healthcare and environmental monitoring, just to name a few. Current terminology used to describe the third wave such as ubiquitous or pervasive computing, ambient intelligence, or the Internet of Things, all have important limitations. Therefore, I have adopted the term “eObjects” for the central technological element of third wave computing. An eObject is defined as an object that is not inherently computerised, but into which has been embedded one or more computer processors with data-collection, data-handling and data communication capabilities. These technological developments have resulted in the creation of new things to be bought and sold, new activities for business and consumers to engage in, and new kinds of commercial relationships between consumers and businesses. My research project will examine how legal rules around the formation of contract and the enforceability of onerous contract clauses operate in the face of this socio-technological change. It is widely recognised that there are distinct legal problems which may arise in relation to socio-technological change. If the development and use of these new forms of information technology give rise to inconsistencies, unmet expectations and unpredictable outcomes in the law, this may well lead to substantial problems for product and service providers, as well as individual consumers using or interacting with the technologies. I intend to consider these issues in the context of Australian law and will also be guided by what is happening in international jurisdictions.

Paper Nr: 2
Title:

A MapReduce based Big-data Framework for Object Extraction from Mosaic Satellite Images

Authors:

Süleyman Eken and Ahmet Sayar

Abstract: We propose a framework stitching of vector representations of large scale raster mosaic images in distributed computing model. In this way, the negative effect of the lack of resources of the central system and scalability problem can be eliminated. The product obtained by this study can be used in applications requiring spatial and temporal analysis on big satellite map images. This study also shows that big data frameworks are not only used in applications of text-based data mining and machine learning algorithms, but also used in applications of algorithms in image processing. The effectiveness of the product realized with this project is also going to be proven by scalability and performance tests performed on real world LandSat-8 satellite images.

Paper Nr: 3
Title:

Generating Business Models for Digitalized Ecosystems - Service-oriented Business Modeling (SoBM) - A Structured Modeling Approach

Authors:

Andreas Pfeiffer

Abstract: For various industries, Lucas et al. (2013) have recently described how intensely organizations, industries, society and the economy are transforming through digital technology implementation in products, services and institutions. Research is asked to find answers to the question of how to identify digitization opportunities, risks and costs. Furthermore, the leverage of digitalization opportunities with regard to customer’s value in use, network perspectives, flexible remodeling of business operations and enlarging business model scope and scale needs to be addressed. Answers can only be found by respecting the distinct nature of digitality, which is a sound basis for generativity as well as evoking high complexity in product, services and network partnerships. The ongoing emobility as well as development of the smart home market can currently be seen as fields excellently demonstrating the enormous and creative potential of digital transformation. This makes it an ideal field of investigation to find answers to the proposed research questions. Taking the requirements of digitalization into account, the paper presents an approach for business model development evolved and tested in the field of emobility and smart homes. This approach is based on the principles of Service-Oriented Architectures (SOA) in combination with ideas of well-proven business modeling methods.

Paper Nr: 4
Title:

A Multi-source Big Data Analytic System in Smart City for Urban Planning and Decision Making

Authors:

Ali Reza Honarvar and Ashkan Sami

Abstract: Various sensors are embedded in different places of smart cities to monitor and collect data about status of cities. The goal of a smart city is to improve the quality of life by improving the efficiency of services and providing residents’ needs using different technologies and mining captured data in cities. Mining such data to extract valuable knowledge involve a large number of challenges because various sources of data in smart cities usually are big, independent, heterogeneous and no semantic is integrated and annotated to them. In this PhD research these concerns will be tackled by developing and proposing a novel system and approach by leveraging linked open data and semantic web technologies, data mining mechanisms and big data processing platforms.