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Workshops

The purpose of workshops is to provide a more interactive and focused platform for presenting and discussing new and emerging ideas. The format of paper presentations may include oral presentations, poster presentations, keynote lectures and panels. Depending on the number of presentations, workshops can be scheduled for 1 day or 2 days. All accepted papers will be published in a special section of the conference proceedings book, under an ISBN reference, and on CD-ROM support. All papers presented at the conference venue will be available at the SCITEPRESS Digital Library. SCITEPRESS is a member of CrossRef and every paper is given a DOI (Digital Object Identifier). The proceedings are submitted for indexation by Thomson Reuters Conference Proceedings Citation Index (ISI), INSPEC, DBLP, EI (Elsevier Engineering Village Index) and Scopus.

WORKSHOPS LIST

SCBDDM 2017Smart Cities, Big Data Analytics and Digital Manufacturing: Inspiring New Organizational forms and Democratizing the Means of Design Innovation and Production
Chair(s): Gary Graham, Mukesh Kumar, Fosso Wamba Samuel, Rashid Mehmood and Patrick Hennelly

WICSPIT 2017Innovative CyberSecurity and Privacy for Internet of Things: Strategies, Technologies, and Implementations
Chair(s): Roger Hallman, Hala Mostafa, Kurt Rohloff and Victor Chang (honorary)

Smart Cities, Big Data Analytics and Digital Manufacturing: Inspiring New Organizational forms and Democratizing the Means of Design Innovation and Production - SCBDDM 2017

Paper Submission: February 27, 2017 (extended)
Authors Notification: March 1, 2017
Camera Ready and Registration: March 13, 2017

Co-chairs

Gary Graham
University of Leeds
United Kingdom
 
Mukesh Kumar
Cambridge University Institute for Manufacturing
United Kingdom
 
Fosso Wamba Samuel
Toulouse Business School
France
 
Rashid Mehmood
King Abdul Aziz University
Saudi Arabia
 
Patrick Hennelly
Institute for Manufacturing, University of Cambridge
United Kingdom
 
Scope

It is evident that very few empirical studies have been conducted to assess the real business value of smart city-big data analytics in the area of digital manufacturing. This includes the value to the firm, the supply chain, city eco-systems and socially to everyday citizens through enhanced design and production capabilities. The main objective of this workshop therefore is to invite scholars and practitioners to present work that focuses on smart city-big data analytics and its integration with digital manufacturing. We will explore new forms of value creation and enhanced capabilities. Furthermore, we will envision how smart city production technologies could make a social contribution through stimulating new organizational forms, local production eco-systems and citizen enabled routes out of austerity.


Innovative CyberSecurity and Privacy for Internet of Things: Strategies, Technologies, and Implementations - WICSPIT 2017

Paper Submission: February 27, 2017 (extended)
Authors Notification: March 1, 2017
Camera Ready and Registration: March 13, 2017

Co-chairs

Roger Hallman
Spawar Systems Center Pacific
United States
 
Hala Mostafa
United Technologies Research Center
United States
 
Kurt Rohloff
New Jersey Institute of Technology
United States
 
Victor Chang (honorary)
IBSS, Xi'an Jiaotong Liverpool University
China
 
Scope

Cyber-attackers are steadily getting more creative and ambitious in their exploits and causing real-world damage (e.g., the German steel mill hack in 2014, the Ukrainian Power Grid hack in 2015). Proprietary and personally identifiable information are vulnerable to leakage as well (e.g., the Sony hack in 2014, the US Office of Personnel Management in 2014). The Internet of Things (IoT), a platform which allows everything to process information, communicate data, and analyze context opens up new vulnerabilities for both security and privacy. Smart buildings and smart cities, for example, will collect and process data for millions of individuals. Industrial systems, which were never intended to be linked via common protocols, are recognized as suddenly being open to security threats that can limit service availability and possibly cause considerable damage. Autonomous systems allowed to operate with minimal oversight are ripe targets for cyber-attacks. Data stored and processed in confidence in the cloud may be subject to exfiltration, leading to public embarrassment or the exposure of proprietary information.


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